Archive for Mises Daily

A Brief History of Progressivism

6819 (1)Mises Daily Tuesday by Andrew Syrios

From prohibition to eugenics to nativism and to Marxism, “progressives” throughout history have repeatedly shown a great fondness for endless social engineering and state control of pretty much anything and everything.

Why Faster Is Sometimes Better, But Not Always

6815Mises Daily Monday by Jonathan Newman:

We see that contemporary mainstream economics is in a holding pattern. With no new math problems, the economists have resorted to timing their computers’ efforts to solve the existing math problems… Meanwhile, from my seat in the research wing of the Mises Institute, I’m close to some interesting and — in terms of a connection to real, human market actors — relevant work in economics.

New Audio Articles from ‘Mises Daily’

Be sure to visit the Audio Mises Daily page if you prefer audio versions of the Daily articles. Some recent titles:

Industrial Policy Is Still a Loser by  & 

Jean-Baptiste Say: An Underrated Revolutionary by 

How To Have Law Without Legislation by 

The Right Way to View Entrepreneurship

6814Mises Daily Weekend by Peter Klein and Nicolai Foss:

Much of the existing research on entrepreneurship focuses only on start-ups and small business. But entrepreneurship is a much broader topic and entrepreneurs appear everywhere as drivers of greater wealth and economic growth. Peter Klein and Nicolai Foss discuss new ways to study this phenomenon.

The Problem with Right-to-Work Laws

6813Mises Daily Friday by Logan Albright

Many free-market advocates approve of right-to-work laws because they diminish the power of monopolist labor unions. Right-to-work laws, however, prohibit employers from dealing with unions in whatever way the employer chooses, and thus just substitute one government mandate for another.

The Neo-Mercantilist Hysteria Over US Trade Deficits

imports2Mises Daily Thursday by Joseph Salerno:

Keynesians are fond of overstating both the magnitude of the trade deficit and its alleged negative effects. In spite of the fact that trade deficits are not an actual problem for our economy, Keynesians propose to “fix” the problem by devaluing the dollar.

Industrial Policy Is Still a Loser

6808Mises Daily Tuesday by by Stewart Dompe and Adam C. Smith

Joesph Stiglitz, 2001 Nobel laureate in economics, wants to revitalize industrial policy through greater government intervention to favor certain technologies over others. He says it’s not about picking winners, but about positive externalities. Either way, it all comes down to central planning.

Employer-Provided Health Care Is Not a Religious Issue

PayslipMises Daily Tuesday by Ryan McMaken:

Contrary to what proponents of government-controlled health care would have us believe, employer-provided health insurance has nothing to do with religion and everything to do with the free exchange of labor for wages.

How the Drug War Drives Child Migrants to the US Border

6810Mises Daily Monday by Mark Thornton

An increasing percentage of migrants to the US-Mexican border are from Central American countries. It is not merely a coincidence that these same areas have been devastated by the American war on drugs, which has destroyed economies and increased crime in much of the region.

 

Rockwell on the State, the Military, and Propaganda

BMises Daily Weekend:

An interview with Lew Rockwell:

War is the health of the state, and by encouraging enthusiasm for war, and deference for the state’s military institutions, states work to increase their own power in many other areas as well. Many citizens and taxpayers are happy to oblige, but that may be changing.

Thomas Piketty and Mises’s ‘The Anti-Capitalistic Mentality’

Money balanceMises Daily Friday:

In his short book The Anti-Capitalistic Mentality, first published in 1954, Ludwig von Mises explains why Piketty’s new anti-capitalist tome is popular among a certain class of people, and why much of Piketty’s book relies on a re-telling of old myths about capitalism.

Jean-Baptiste Say: An Underrated Revolutionary

6802Mises Daily Thursday by Carmen Dorobăț

Jean-Baptiste Say was no mere French popularizer of the ideas of Adam Smith. As a forerunner of the Austrian School and a father of laissez-faire in France, Say’s insights continue to challenge interventionist economists to this day. Everl Schoorl’s new biography sheds new light on Say’s life and works.

The Jeffersonian Secessionist Tradition

hartfordMises Daily Wednesday by Thomas DiLorenzo

In examining newspaper editorials of the nineteenth century and Jefferson’s own views of secession, Thomas DiLorenzo explores the once-widespread belief, both North and South, that the American states were part of a voluntary union

Congress, Extortion, and Unfunded Mandates

Highway Signpost with Compliance wordingMises Daily Tuesday by James Bennett:

As the federal government expanded, so did its power to order about lesser jurisdictions. Today, federal mandates instruct states to regulate the minutiae of daily life from seat belts to math tests. James Bennett discusses his new book on federal mandates with the Mises Institute.

 

What Is the Rate of Return on the Louisiana Purchase?

6799Mises Daily Monday by David Howden and Daniel Fernández-Renau Atienza

The true benefits of the Louisiana and Alaska Purchases are less clear than their value to pro-government propaganda.

How To Have Law Without Legislation

Themis 2662Mises Daily Weekend by Murray Rothbard

A stateless society is not a lawless one. Apologists for the state maintain that state-made legislation is indispensable, but in this essay, Rothbard explores Bruno Leoni’s call for a return to the ancient traditions and principles of “judge-made law” as a method of limiting the state and insuring liberty.

Investors and Austrian Economics

6795Mises Daily Friday:

Robert Blumen, a software engineer with a background in financial applications, recently spoke with the Mises Institute about the Austrian School’s growing influence among investors.

When Steelers Steal

6798Mises Daily Thursday by Christopher Westley:

In a free-market economy, firms threatened with competition often respond by searching for ways to increase efficiencies, attempting to lower costs and improving on economies of scale and scope. Meanwhile, protectionists and labor unions seek to avoid having to become more efficient by simply outlawing competition.

Why the Mainstream Fails to Understand Recessions

6797Mises Daily Wednesday by Hal Snarr.

Mainstream economists often still maintain that nobody predicted the 2008 financial crisis and recession. Many Austrians saw it coming, of course, and thanks to the work of Roger Garrison and other Austrians, we also better understand the details of how booms and busts work.

 

How Government Forces the Poor Into Black Markets

6796Mises Daily Tuesday by Peter St. Onge:

Industrious low-income people often must turn to doing business in the black market to avoid the burdensome costs of government regulations. The creation of a cashless society would ensure that even these opportunities to make a living will be abolished forever.