Archive for Japan

Hoppe’s ‘What Must be Done’ Now in Japanese.

41nhoeNjJwL._AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-34,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_Tatsuya Iwakura strikes again. This time, he’s translated ‘What Must Be Done’ by Hans-Hermann Hoppe.

Here is the English version, and here is the Japanese version at Amazon.

This is a monograph. Summary:

How should anarcho-capitalists engage the modern state? Hans-Hermann Hoppe dissects the nature of the modern democratic state and suggests strategies for enacting a bottom-up libertarian revolution in ideology and civil government.

Hoppe begins by examining the nature of the state as “a monopolist of defense and the provision and enforcement of law and order.” Like all state-mandated monopolies, the monopoly of law enforcement also leads to higher prices and lower quality of services. Why is this state of affairs tolerated? The modern democratic states, much more than the monarchies and princely estates of old, are seen as moral and necessary despite ample evidence to the contrary.

In the minds of most modern citizens of democratic states, law and order is what the state says it is, and this has led to a long period of centralization and power consolidation by those states.

How can the libertarian fight back against this trend?

Hoppe offers a program that can pave the way for a new libertarian society.

Austrian Economics and Interventionism in Japan

6629Writes Marc Abela in today’s Mises Daily: 

As is the case with Canada and Sweden, Japan has succeeded in achieving a relatively decent economy despite the very invasive and massive burden imposed by the taxing authorities. Taxes are very high at all levels in Japan. The rate is 50 percent for inheritance and death taxes; corporate taxes hit 40 percent very rapidly for almost all businesses; any decent individual income will put you in the 40 percent bracket; and then you have municipal taxes, prefectural taxes, property, vehicle, liquor, tobacco, gasoline, and others taxes. The list is nearly endless. Numerous and cumbersome government regulations prevent new entries to industry and being able to compete with the archaic corporate mammoths known as “zaibatsu” (Mitsubishi, Mitsui, Sumitomo, Yasuda, and a few others) who control and own most of the industries, and make changes at a glacial pace. In fact, since government regulations are so exceedingly high, it can be argued that most businesses and most industries are defacto “nationalized” and behave like state-owned enterprises.

 

‘The Essential von Mises’ and ‘Scholar, Creator, Hero’ now in Japanese

51nmz72qOnL._AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-37,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_Rothbard’s  The Essential von Mises which includes Rothbard’s biographical monograph Ludwig von Mises: Scholar Creator Hero  is now available in Japanese, thanks, yet again, to the efforts of Tatsuya Iwakura.

Both are available in one volume now available as an ebook on Amazon. 

Following is a part of the ‘book description’ of Amazon (translated):

Rothbard’s ‘The Essential von Mises’ was published in 1973. And now it is coupled with another book  ’Scholar, Creator, Hero’ written by Rothbard in 1990. Each book corresponds to part 1 and part 2 of this book.

In part 1, the contributions to economics by Ludwig von Mises, are outlined in chronological order. This is useful as an introduction to Mises and Austrian Economics.

Part 2 is a biography of Mises. Rothbard talks about his feelings toward the results of of Mises’s search for economic truth and what he did in spite of many severe restrictions put on his efforts.

When I read this, I (the translator) imagine the following passage from Mises’s ‘Human Action’:

“Many a genius could have used his gifts to render his life agreeable and joyful; he did not even consider such a possibility and chose the thorny path without hesitation.” (The Scholar’s Edition, 1998) p.139