World History / David Gordon

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The New History and the Old: Critical Essays and Reappraisals, by Gertrude Himmelfarb

World HistoryPhilosophy and Methodology

07/01/2004Mises Review
Gertrude Himmelfarb is an intellectual historian of great distinction. She has specialized in British nineteenth-century history; and her book on Lord Acton, her study of nineteenth-century thought on poverty,
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Hope and Memory: Lessons from the Twentieth Century, by Tzvetan Todorov

The Police StateWorld History

07/01/2004Mises Review
Tzvetan Todorov’s career as a writer has taken a surprising course. A Bulgarian long resident in France, he acquired an international reputation as a structuralist literary critic.
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Mary Wollstonecraft: Human Rights and the French Revolution, by Roberta A. Modugno

World HistoryPolitical Theory

04/01/2004Mises Review
Roberta Modugno’s excellent book is a fundamental contribution to our understanding of the history of classical liberalism. She complicates in a remarkable way an argument advanced by Friedrich Hayek.
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Theory and History

World HistoryPolitical Theory

03/01/2004Audio/Video
Recorded at Mises University 2003.
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Guns and Violence: The English Experience, Joyce Lee Malcolm

World History

10/01/2002Mises Review
Professor Joyce Lee Malcolm's erudite study has changed my view of gun control. Before reading her book, I was inclined to see control in this way: Leaving aside questions about individual rights,
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The Long Truce: How Toleration Made the World Safe for Power and Profit, by A.J. Conyers

World HistoryPolitical Theory

10/01/2001Mises Review
A supporter of the absolute state might defend his cause with many slogans, but freedom of religious opinion, one would think, could hardly find a place among them.
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The Why of World War I, by Ralph Raico

War and Foreign PolicyWorld History

10/01/2000Mises Review
The second edition of this outstanding book includes two new chapters, one of which merits extensive notice. In "World War I: The Turning Point," Ralph Raico brilliantly encapsulates the origins of the Great War,
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The Rise and Decline of the State, by Martin van Creveld

World HistoryPolitical Theory

07/01/2000Mises Review
Martin van Creveld's outstanding book traces the origin, growth, and decline of what Nietzsche termed "that coldest of all cold monsters, the state." By "state," our author means something more limited than do contemporary libertarians.
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Property and Freedom, by Richard Pipes

World HistoryPrivate Property

07/01/2000Mises Review
Mr. Pipes has written a very good book, but he has made life difficult for me as a reviewer. He defends the importance of property rights throughout the book, but he does not argue systematically,
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John Stuart Mill on Liberty and Control, by Joseph Hamburger

BiographiesWorld HistoryPolitical Theory

04/01/2000Mises Review
As usual Murray Rothbard was right. In his Classical Economics, he contrasts John Stuart Mill with his father James Mill: "Instead of possessing a hard-nosed cadre intellect, John Stuart was the quintessence of soft rather than hard core,
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