World History / David Gordon

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6. Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Legal SystemWorld HistoryPhilosophy and MethodologyPolitical Theory

06/07/2007Audio/Video
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 1712-1778, influenced the French Revolution with his political philosophy and his social contract theory. The perspective of many of today’s environmentalists can be traced back to Rousseau, espousing that all degenerates in man’s hands. The Social Contract (1972), his most...
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4. Thomas Hobbes

World HistoryPhilosophy and MethodologyPolitical Theory

06/06/2007Audio/Video
Thomas Hobbes, 1588-1679, best known work is Leviathan (1651) which established social contract theory. His liberal thinking included: The right of the individual; the natural equality of all men; the artificial character of the political order; the view that all legitimate political power must be...
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5. John Locke

Legal SystemWorld HistoryPhilosophy and MethodologyPolitical Theory

06/06/2007Audio/Video
John Locke, 1632-1704, was the Father of Classical Liberalism . Human beings in their rationality are in God’s image. His law of nature was ethical and universal. Human preservation was tantamount. Each person has a property in himself. Property precedes government.
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2. Aristotle

Legal SystemWorld HistoryPhilosophy and MethodologyPolitical Theory

06/05/2007Audio/Video
Aristotle, 384-322 BC, joined Plato’s Academy in Athens at eighteen and remained there until the age of thirty-seven. He was not a citizen of Athens. His writings constitute the first comprehensive system of Western philosophy.
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3. Thomas Aquinas

Legal SystemWorld HistoryPhilosophy and MethodologyPolitical Theory

06/05/2007Audio/Video
Thomas Aquinas, 1225-1274, was an Italian Dominican friar and Catholic priest and an immensely influential philosopher and theologian in the tradition of scholasticism. Thomas attempted to synthesize Aristotelian philosophy with the principles of Christianity.
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1. Plato

World HistoryPhilosophy and MethodologyPolitical Theory

06/04/2007Audio/Video
Intellectual historians want to look at the past to find questions of value. Greeks are considered the start of political philosophy. Plato, 428-348 BCE, is the most famous. Plato’s teacher, Socrates, was killed by Athenian democracy.
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Three New Deals: Reflections on Roosevelt's America, Mussolini's Italy, and Hitler's Germany, by Wolfgang Schivelbusch

U.S. HistoryWorld History

10/01/2006Mises Review
Critics of Roosevelt's New Deal often liken it to fascism. Roosevelt's numerous defenders dismiss this charge as reactionary propaganda; but as Wolfgang Schivelbusch makes clear, it is perfectly true.
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The Political Sociology of Freedom: Adam Ferguson and F.A. Hayek, by Ronald Hamowy

World HistoryPolitical Theory

10/01/2006Mises Review
Ronald Hamowy combines extraordinary critical powers with painstaking historical research. His skills are much in evidence in this collection of his essays, but I have an additional reason to call this book to my readers' attention.
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The Craft of International History: A Guide to Method, by Marc Trachtenberg

War and Foreign PolicyWorld History

07/01/2006Mises Review
Marc Trachtenberg's guidebook is intended as a "how-to" book for students of diplomatic history and political science. But much of it is of great value to anyone interested in a revisionist brand of history.
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Blunders, Lies, and Other Historicist Habits

Media and CultureWorld HistoryPhilosophy and Methodology

08/31/2005Mises Daily Articles
John Lukacs, in his own estimation, is much more than an ordinary historian. In what he considers his most important book, Historical Consciousness
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